Health and Wellness

Fit for a Queen: Nakesha White and the ‘Royalty Eats’ Brand

Fit for a Queen: Nakesha White and the ‘Royalty Eats’ Brand

We took some time to reminisce about life as children growing up in Charlottesville. She reached deep down and said exasperatingly, “Sarad, I got it out the mud. You gotta go get it. I try not to ever let the sun beat me up.” She gave a testament to her grind and the hard work it takes to accomplish so much, seemingly so fast.  “I couldn’t have done it without my mom. She wouldn’t let me give up on my dreams. I do miss the nursing field, but this is my calling. This is where I am supposed to be.”

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COVID-19 Community Information Handout

COVID-19 Community Information Handout

Ebony Jade Hilton, MD, Dr. Leigh-Ann Webb (Emergency Medicine Physician at UVA), community member Mr. Alex-Zan (Humanitarian, Author), and 2020 Ezra Jack Keats award winning illustrator, Ashleigh Corrin, created a COVID-19 resource that they hope will be useful for our community. In the link below, you will find a guide of how to prepare your home, prevent spread of the virus, and detect its symptoms.

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Webcast with Yolanda Rush of YRUSH Tech Group

Webcast with Yolanda Rush of YRUSH Tech Group

In this new series of Webcasts, Sarad ‘Speaks’ Davenport will interview different guests on a series of topics to include business, health, and art. In this particular Webcast, Sarad talks to Yolanda Rush of YRUSH Tech Group. Sarad and Yolanda engage in a conversation about business responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and the future of business beyond the pandemic.

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We (Still) Wear the Mask

We (Still) Wear the Mask

On June 22, 2018, Justin Reid (far left), Virginia Humanities’ director of African American Programs and co-creator of #UnmaskingCville, and Samantha Willis (far right), journalist and co-creator of #UnmaskingCville and #UnmaskingRVA, pictured with the series’ panelists (from left): Niya Bates, public historian of African-American Life at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, student activist Zyahna Bryant, Mayor Nikuyah Walker, and journalist Jordy Yager. Photo Credit: Pat Jarrett, Virginia Humanities

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28 Days of Black Hair

28 Days of Black Hair

No matter what background or ethnicity we belong to, hair, or the lack of it, is a part of our appearance. It’s an integral piece of how we present ourselves, helping define our personality without us having to say a word. When our hair is not accepted or when it’s deemed “bad hair” we can start to think that maybe there is something bad about who we are. Maybe we aren’t pretty or beautiful because our hair doesn’t look like the women in the magazines we read or movies we see. Maybe we’ll draw too much of the wrong sort of attention or look unprofessional if we opt for a bolder haircut, locs, or a voluminous twist-out.

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Yoga  for Mind Body & Soul

Yoga for Mind Body & Soul

Now more than ever, people are turning to alternative wellness and fitness strategies to manage stress, cope with mental health issues, and deal with chronic medical conditions.  Within the African-American community, many of these issues are compounded by stigma, limited access to resources, and systemic injustices.  Recent data collected by the US Department of Health and Human Services suggests that African-Americans are 20% more likely to report serious psychological distress than their white counterparts.

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About Us

Vinegar Hill Magazine is a space that is designed to support and project a more inclusive social narrative, to promote entrepreneurship, and to be a beacon for art, culture, and politics in Central Virginia.

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Recent News

Business,Community Development

A Letter to my Younger Self

by Quinton Harrell Before my wife and I were married, before we were even dating, I would often marvel over her recurring references to her parents in our conversations about life, love, and learning. I was quite fascinated with the hyperbole, which it seemed to be...

Mayor Nikuyah Walker

Community Development,Politics

Blue Skies: Mayor Nikuyah Walker in Her Own Words

With this as the backdrop, we talked for three hours about equity, partnerships, governing style, and much more in a conversation that could have continued all day, if not interrupted by a family emergency. I hope to continue our discussion and present it here at another time. As always Mayor Walker was candid and fearless with her responses and insights. What comes through in our discussion is that she remains a champion of the under-represented as she is willing to force conversations that some deem difficult.

Past Publications