28 Days of Black Hair

by Kori Price

As a little girl, I wanted long, straight hair like my friends had. I wanted my hair to be sleek and shiny, to bounce and sway when I walked. My dilemma? I was black, they weren’t. My hair was a coarse, tough, thicket of naps. It was unlike my white friends’ hair and even unlike some of the black girls I knew at school.  They had “good hair” and I had “bad hair”.

Good hair versus bad hair has plagued beauty standards in America far too long. It has held us back from embracing not only our hair, but who we are as well. I relaxed (chemically straightened) my hair after feeling pressure from bullies on the school bus and pressure from less obvious places: black actresses on TV, black women around my hometown, and my black Barbie dolls. All of the black women I knew or saw had straight or relaxed hair. Having unkempt or “out-of-control” hair could be grounds for being talked about both inside and outside of the black community: “Why did her Mama let her out the house with all that hair all over her head?” or “Now, that’s unusual…”

Relaxers made my hair brittle and breakage was frequent, often nulling any new growth I had. Over the course of 10 years with relaxers, my hair never grew longer than its mid-length bob. I was frustrated and upset. I wanted nothing more than to have long hair. No amount of trimming or greasing or deep conditioning would help. I had to stop relaxing it, cut off the permed hair—the “Big Chop”—and go natural, a last ditch effort for growth. After the initial shock of the big chop, I learned how to take care of my natural hair, understanding what it needed and what I could do with it; I learned to love it. At last, my hair was healthy and growing. I was defying the stigma that my hair was bad and that I needed to fix it.

No matter what background or ethnicity we belong to, hair, or the lack of it, is a part of our appearance. It’s an integral piece of how we present ourselves, helping define our personality without us having to say a word. When our hair is not accepted or when it’s deemed “bad hair” we can start to think that maybe there is something bad about who we are. Maybe we aren’t pretty or beautiful because our hair doesn’t look like the women in the magazines we read or movies we see. Maybe we’ll draw too much of the wrong sort of attention or look unprofessional if we opt for a bolder haircut, locs, or a voluminous twist-out.

These notions, of course, are all false.

My hope is that 28 Days of Black Hair will both provide a glimpse into black culture and will inspire conversations and discussions with your friends, coworkers, and family members during and beyond this year’s Black History Month. I hope that you will talk about the similarities and differences between your backgrounds, ethnicities, and experiences. Through thoughtful and respectful discussions, we start to understand each other. We can further shape, develop, and share our own individual truths.

Please view 28 Days of Black Hair here: www.koripricephotography.com

About Us

Vinegar Hill Magazine is a space that is designed to support and project a more inclusive social narrative, to promote entrepreneurship, and to be a beacon for art, culture, and politics in Central Virginia.

Categories

Recent News

Business,Community Development

A Letter to my Younger Self

by Quinton Harrell Before my wife and I were married, before we were even dating, I would often marvel over her recurring references to her parents in our conversations about life, love, and learning. I was quite fascinated with the hyperbole, which it seemed to be...

Mayor Nikuyah Walker

Community Development,Politics

Blue Skies: Mayor Nikuyah Walker in Her Own Words

With this as the backdrop, we talked for three hours about equity, partnerships, governing style, and much more in a conversation that could have continued all day, if not interrupted by a family emergency. I hope to continue our discussion and present it here at another time. As always Mayor Walker was candid and fearless with her responses and insights. What comes through in our discussion is that she remains a champion of the under-represented as she is willing to force conversations that some deem difficult.

Past Publications

You May Also Like

Still Determined: Mending Minds of Color

Still Determined: Mending Minds of Color

A Charlottesville mental health services agency helps holistically heal the minds, bodies and spirits of Black, Latinx, and underprivileged women, as other groups offer mental health support to local people of color. By Samantha Willis | Photos by Lorenzo Dickerson |...

Equitable Entry Into the CBD and Marijuana Industry

Equitable Entry Into the CBD and Marijuana Industry

As the American economy prepares for a boom in the Cannabis/Hemp/Marijuana market, there remains uncertainty about how people of color and Black people, in particular, will be integrated as owners in the burgeoning market.